Oloyede Tells Rich Nigerians To Educate Their Children Here, But See. Barau Disagrees

 

The Oasis Reporters

September 23, 2017

Prof. Ishaq Oloyede, Jibrin Barau

The man who lowered JAMB cut off point from 180 to 120, Prof. Ishaq Oloyede, the Registrar of the Joint Admissions and Matriculation Board, has advised the elite to stop sending their children abroad for their first degree education.

Oloyede, who noted that private universities must be “realistic by considering the economic situation in the country,” said some private universities in the country were set up to make money.

The registrar disclosed this on Thursday night in Abuja, during a training and sensitisation for admission officers and stakeholders from universities.

Oloyede added that the board would no longer consider students admitted by universities, who did not have the Ordinary Level and the Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examination requirements.

He said, “Private universities have a challenge of high costs of school fees. I believe that the private universities are established for worthy purposes. In Nigeria, all of them claim they are not for profit but most of them are for profits. Let private institutions be declaring their status.

“’Not for profit’ means that they are doing it for public services and their charges will reflect that. When they are able to recover their overhead, I think they can be okay. But some are established, especially for making money. It is not a crime; but show us where you stand. The market forces will determine where students will be. What is happening is that the private universities must be realistic in taking into consideration the economic realities in the country. Otherwise, they will put themselves out of the market.

“I believe also that it is better for the elite in Nigeria to send their children to universities and higher education institutions in Nigeria. But they can go abroad for higher education.”

Oloyede added that the board had also introduced the Central Admissions Processing System to ensure “transparency and tracking” of the admissions carried out by the universities.

Meanwhile, the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Tertiary Institutions and TETFund, Senator Jibrin Barau has ticked off several reasons why diversity in education is a desideratum for a balanced life.

Senator Jibrin Barau, dismissed the call by Prof. Ishaq Oloyede that children of public officials should be restricted to the country’s public schools.

The lawmaker said Nigeria needed to have socio-cultural exchanges with other countries.

According to Barau, any law that would force public officers to send their children to schools in the country was not good for Nigeria.

He noted that there were students from Cameroon and Niger Republic who also studied in Nigeria.

He said, “Making a law to bar people from taking their children outside to study is something that will not be good for our country. We know that it is always good to mingle with people from other parts of the world when it comes to the issue of education.

“You cannot be an island to yourself; interaction is very necessary. We also allow people from other parts of the world to learn from here. You are aware that students from Cameroon, Niger and other parts of the world come here. We have exchange students who come from European nations to this country. You must have that interaction.”

Barau said Nigeria should develop universities and educational institutions to the level that those who sent their children abroad would patronise institutions in the country.

Ghana, also an English speaking West African country like Nigeria rakes in over $1.5 billion as income from Nigerian students who go to study in their country due to inadequacies like opportunities and incessant strikes in the Nigerian university system.

Greg Abolo

Blogger at The Oasis Reporters.

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